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Marantz MM8077 Multi-channel Amplifier

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HTR Product Rating

Performance
4.5 Stars
Value
4 Stars
Overall
4.5 Stars

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71myrCW5CKL.jpgThe MM8077 is Marantz's biggest multi-channel amplifier, with 150 watts of power in each of its seven channels. The MM8077 ($2,399) is designed to complement the new Marantz AV processors, such as the AV8801 that we recently reviewed. The design of the MM8077 follows that of the AV8801, with a porthole in the center of the brushed-black front panel and curved sides that make for a clean and attractive style.

While not especially heavy at 39 pounds, the MM8077 feels solid due to its construction, which includes a copper-plated chassis with multi-layer top and bottom panels. A single, large toroidal-transformer-based power supply feeds all seven channels. The MM8077 utilizes a current feedback design, with complementary push-pull circuits, and a Wilson current mirror, which is said to reduce distortion in the high sound range. This amplifier borrows other design traits from Marantz's classic amplifiers, including high-efficiency power transistors that are said to improve transient performance and proprietary "condensers" (capacitors) with 100,000 micro-farads of storage capacity. In short, the circuit design borrows characteristics from Marantz's well-regarded stereo amplifiers in an attempt to bring the musicality that Marantz is known for to this modern seven-channel amplifier, which is capable of 150 watts into each channel into eight ohms (180 watts into six ohms).

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All of this power can generate lots of heat, which can damage components unless it is drawn away. The MM8077 uses a combination of passive and active cooling techniques. A large cooling tunnel made out of heatsinks draws heat away like a chimney; when this approach cannot draw away enough heat, temperature sensors engage variable-speed cooling fans to increase cooling. The internal heatsink design keeps the exterior clean and simple. The back panel has balanced and single-ended inputs for each channel, an IEC power plug port, and five small jacks for control functions, including a 12-volt trigger in/out, flasher input, and remote control in/out. If your system cannot work with any of these control options and you do not want to have to walk over to the amplifier to turn it on and off, you are still in luck, as the MM8077 has a signal-sensing feature that can be configured to power up the amplifier when it senses an audio signal.

Click on over to Page 2 for the High Points, Low Points, Competition and Comparison, and Conclusion . . .

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