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Mitsubishi HC7800D 3D DLP Projector Reviewed

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HTR Product Rating

Performance
3.5 Stars
Value
4 Stars
Overall
4 Stars

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Mitsubishi-HC7800D-3D-Projector-review.jpgIn late 2011, Mitsubishi introduced its second 3D-capable projector, the HC7800D--a follow-up to the company's higher-end HC9000D SXRD projector. We have not performed a hands-on review of the HC7800D, but here is an overview of its features. The HC7800D is a 1080p DLP projector that uses Texas Instruments' latest 0.65-inch DMD chip and a 4x-speed, six-segment color wheel; it features an auto iris, two anamorphic picture modes, and a 120Hz refresh rate with de-judder technology. It has a rated dynamic contrast ratio of 100,000:1 and a rated brightness of 1,500 ANSI lumens, and it supports a screen size of 50 to 300 inches. The HC7800D offers manual 1.5x zoom and focus controls, plus keystone correction and adjustable feet; a vertical lens-shift dial is available (35 percent), but the projector does not offer horizontal lens shifting. The HC7800D measures 15.6 x 12.9 x 5.6 inches, weighs 12.3 pounds, and uses a 240-watt lamp, with a listed lamp life of 5,000 hours in Low mode and 2,000 hours in Standard mode.

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The HC7800D uses active 3D technology, which means it alternately flashes a full-resolution left-eye and right-eye image. Active 3D requires the use of special active-shutter 3D glasses that sync with the projector's signal to direct the appropriate image to each eye. You also need to connect a separate 3D sync emitter that allows the projector and glasses to communicate; Mitsubishi has kindly included the emitter in the package, but the EY-3DGS-78U 3D glasses are sold separately (for about $199 each).

The connection panel includes two HDMI inputs, plus a single component video and VGA input. You also get RS-232 for integration into an advanced control system, dual 12-volt triggers, a LAN port for network control, and the 3D sync port to attach the EY-3D-EMT1 emitter. The setup menu has an extensive offering of picture adjustments, including: eight picture modes (with ISF Day and Night modes); five color temperature presets, plus RGB contrast and brightness controls; six gamma presets and two advanced user modes; a full color management system; dual lamp modes; noise reduction; four iris options (off, plus three auto modes); and frame-rate conversion with settings for off, true video (produces that smoother, video-like effect), and true film (a more subtle use of frame interpolation). The HC7800D offers eight aspect-ratio options, including two anamorphic picture modes that allow you to view 2.35:1 images with no black bars (when the projector is mated with an add-on lens). Overscan adjustment is available.

In terms of 3D setup, you can select a 3D input format (auto, frame packing, side by side, top and bottom), adjust the 3D depth (in 10 steps), and swap the left and right images if necessary. This projector also supports 2D-to-3D conversion.

Read about the high points and low points of the HC7800D on Page 2.
continue to page two
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