Mark Levinson No. 433 Triple Monaural Amplifier Reviewed

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levinson_433-reviewed.gifWhen it comes to power amps and ultra-high-end home theater components Mark Levinson has to rest near or at the top of the list. No other brand, save maybe Krell, posses such a storied reputation for quality and performance than Mark Levinson. Their triple mono amplifier, the No. 433 reviewed here, is no exception. Designed for those not looking for sonic compromises in 5.1 or 7.1 home theater or music playback systems, there are some who suggest this is one of the most relevant products Mark Levinson has built in over a decade.

Additional Resources
• Read more audiophile grade multi-channel amp reviews here from the likes of Sunfire, Classe, Emotiva, Krell, Mark Levinson and many others

Retailing for a hefty $10,000.00 retail, the No. 433 is by no means inexpensive though its far from the most expensive offering from Mark Levinson or their lofty competition. The No. 433 sports an attractive finish with a modern design flare that sits well with me and looks absolutely stunning in a custom configured rack. It's a beast of an amp weighing in at 115 pounds and measuring in at nearly 18 inches wide by seven and a half inches tall and 20 inches deep. The No. 433 boasts a power rating of 200 Watts per channel into eight ohms and doubles to 400 into four Ohms. The No. 433 is a true triple mono design for maximum sonic clarity and performance, with each amplifier section having its own low noise (and I mean low) torodial transformer mated to each channel. Unlike other amplifiers in the No. 433's class it is void of sharp heat sinks, utilizing a convection style thermal system that keeps it remarkably cool to the touch even under strenuous playback levels.

The rear panel of the No. 433 features three sets of wing nut style binding posts, a Mark Levinson staple, capable of accepting bare wire or spade terminations only. You can connect the No. 433 to your processor via unbalanced or balanced inputs, with the balanced inputs sounding marginally better overall. It has a 12-volt trigger and a detachable power cord that round out its list of features.

Read The High Points, The Low Points and the Conclusion on Page 2

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HTR Product Rating for Mark Levinson No. 433 Triple Monaural Amplifier

Criteria Rating

Performance

5

Value

4

Overall

4.5

Disagree with our product rating? Email us and tell us why you think this product should receive a higher rating.


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