Monitor Audio Silver 100 Speaker System Reviewed

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Monitor Audio Silver 100 Speaker System Reviewed

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It's a good feeling to unbox a set of speakers and be given pause at the attention paid to aesthetics. Such was the case with the Monitor Audio Silver Series 5.1-channel system I was sent for review. The system featured two Silver 100 stand-mount bookshelf speakers ($1,049/pair) for the main left/right channels, the Silver C150 center channel ($725), two Silver 50 bookshelf speakers ($875/pair) for the surrounds, and the Silver W-12 subwoofer ($1,650)--all of which boasted a rather stunning walnut finish.

Monitor-silver100-walnut.jpgThe Silver 100 uses a one-inch gold dome C-CAM (Ceramic-Coated Aluminum/Magnesium) tweeter and an eight-inch C-CAM woofer that features Rigid Surface Technology (RST) that's said to enhance stiffness for greater speed and accuracy (it also looks cool). The Silver 100 measures 9.06 inches wide by 14.75 high by 12.94 deep and weighs 20.5 pounds.

The Silver 50, meanwhile, is basically a scaled-down version of the 100, with a smaller cabinet and a smaller 5.25-inch C-CAM woofer. And the Silver C150 center channel uses a pair of 5.25-inch C-CAM woofers resting on either side of the gold dome C-CAM tweeter. It measures 17.69 inches wide by 6.5 high by nine deep and weighs 20 pounds. The speakers feature magnetic grilles that are attractive and complementary; however, I'm not sure you'll want to use them, given how attractive the speakers are when left naked.

Monitor-silverw-12.jpgThe Silver W-12 subwoofer comes loaded with a 500-watt Class D amp, a 12-inch C-CAM woofer, an APC (Automatic Position Correction) system, a continuously variable crossover (40 to 120 Hz), a top-mounted volume control, and three EQ settings (music, movies, and impact). It measures 13.38 inches wide by 14.56 high by 16.13 deep and weighs a chunky 44.3 pounds, with a grille that attaches via grille pins.

Monitor's C-CAM tweeter features a vented Neo-magnet system that produces ultra-clean highs--and is also easy on the eyes. The C-CAM woofers derive as much as possible from their size and feature a concave profile that's said to improve damping and enhance midrange clarity. While I often find manufacturer descriptions to be rife with hyperbole, that was not my experience with the Monitor Audio Silver Series.

Monitor-silverc150.jpgThe Hookup
I began by swapping the Monitor speakers in for my existing Definitive Technology Mythos speakers and connecting them to my Integra DTR-70.6 AV receiver, with cabling provided by Wireworld. The Monitors are set up for biwiring, but I did not go that route. My main source was an LG UP870 4K Ultra-HD Blu-ray player.

After a fairly lengthy and painful (due to my lack of patience) break-in session, it was time to put the Silver Series through its paces.

Performance
I spent more time auditioning and trying to challenge these Monitor Audio speakers than I normally do during the review process, which is a testament to both their sonic prowess and their versatility.

Typically, I'll begin my critical listening of a 5.1 system using two-channel music. In this case, though, my eight-year-old (future lobbyist) convinced me to start with the Ultra HD Blu-ray version of Despicable Me 3 (Universal). While he wasn't thrilled with my clinical approach to this movie-watching session, which included note-taking and multiple rewinds, even he noticed the improvement over our existing speakers--not bad for an eight-year-old and a good omen for the Monitor speakers. The film starts with a bang, and my first take-away was the depth and accuracy of the bass. This was prior to me using the W-12's APC (Auto Position Correction) and with zero tweaking of the subwoofer beyond volume. It was deep, compelling, and a visceral upgrade over my Definitive sub in terms of depth and control. My listening room is of decent size (roughly 300 square feet), and the Monitor system proved a much more capable pairing for the space than my existing speakers.

Next up was another bit of 4K goodness in the form of Dunkirk (Warner Brothers). For those of you who've seen the film, you know that it's light on dialogue and heavy on action ... it's also a must-see film. While watching Chapter 3, "The Air," I was impressed to note that dialogue remained intelligible, despite the cacophony of Allied vs. Axis action--a solid showing for the C150 center channel. It helped that I'd recently watched both Despicable Me 3 and Dunkirk through my reference Mythos system; while it was not a true A/B comparison, it did help me to discern differences. The most obvious difference was that the Monitor speakers' larger drivers moved more air and better filled the larger room. As Tom Hardy and his fellow RAF pilots come under attack from the Luftwaffe, you not only have the intense sonic assault of the air battle, but the music begins to hit a pulse-pounding crescendo. The Monitor speakers captured all of this with remarkable precision and depth, making for quite an experience.

I played back this scene several times while pushing the volume hard, and I came away impressed that the dialogue (what little there was) remained coherent while the bass remained well defined and, as I wrote, "downright friggin' deep." It's a testament to solid engineering that the folks at Monitor are able to--by using an ultra-long-throw 12-inch driver with a concave C-CAM cone, coupled with a DSP controlled 500-watt amp--deliver considerably deep and well-controlled bass. It's also worth noting that Monitor's proprietary APC (Automatic Position Correction) is simple to use, takes less than five minutes, and provides a noticeable improvement in frequency response. I had such a positive experience with the Monitor system as a whole that it's hard to call the W-12 the star of the show, but let's just say that it did, indeed, steal the show at times.

One more feature of note on the sub: kudos to Monitor for putting the most oft-used controls (volume, EQ switching, the microphone input, etc.) directly on top of the unit. I didn't realize this until I'd very carefully placed the sub and was lamenting having to move it to access the microphone input ... needless to say, it was a pleasant surprise.

Before moving on to some lossless 5.1 music, I watched a bit of the Valspar Classic (that's golf, for those of you mercifully not in the know) and made a couple of notes regarding the full, natural vocals put forth by the C150 center channel. The Monitor system even made some commercials more palatable, with the My Pillow spot being the notable exception. Nothing can make that one palatable.

Click over to Page Two for more Performance observations, as well as The Downside, Comparison & Competition, and Conclusion...


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HTR Product Rating for Monitor Audio Silver 100 Speaker System

Criteria Rating

Performance

5

Value

4.5

Overall

5

Disagree with our product rating? Email us and tell us why you think this product should receive a higher rating.

Buy Now At
Amazon

Please support HomeTheaterReview.com’s free content model by purchasing your AV gear (or other stuff) via Amazon.com. We get a few bucks here and there, which helps us create more and more top-level reviews and content for you to enjoy!


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