Vizio P Series Quantum X Ultra HD Smart TV Reviewed

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Vizio P Series Quantum X Ultra HD Smart TV Reviewed

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The Vizio P Series Quantum X is, according to the company, their brightest, most colorful, most accurate display to date. If that sounds like something you've heard before, you're not crazy. It was the P Series Quantum that was once the harbinger of these same traits. This wouldn't be too bad if the P Series Quantum was some years old, but it isn't. The original P Series is hardly a year old, which means it's quite possible you may have purchased it just a month or two ago thinking you had the best of the best, and now here comes the X, along with an updated 2019 Vizio lineup that adds quantum dots at every level from M Series on up. Don't you just love technology? 

The X comes in two sizes: 65- and 75-inch diagonal variants. The 65-inch, reviewed here, has a MSRP of $2,199.99, but if you shop smartly you will likely find it cheaper--much cheaper. From a visual standpoint, there isn't much of a difference between the chassis of the P Series Quantum X and the 2018 P Series Quantum I reviewed last year. The P Series Quantum X has an all-black bezel whereas the 2018 P Series Quantum sported a more graphite colored one. The 65-inch P Series Quantum X measures nearly 57 inches across, 33 inches tall, and two and a quarter inches deep (without stand) and tips the scales at just under 73 pounds. This puts the P Series Quantum X in the slim, but not wafer-thin category, which is okay by me, as some TVs feel too thin for their own good in my humble opinion. The P Series Quantum X feels substantial and competently built, something that can withstand a bit of "life," unlike some thinner LED and OLED displays available nowadays. The look of the P Series Quantum X is, again, rather minimalist, which is a good thing and shows just how far Vizio has come over the years with respect to its industrial design.

Diving into the P Series Quantum X's spec sheet reveals few differences between it and its predecessor; in fact, the only difference that I could see between the two models was the P Series Quantum X's number of Local Dimming Zones, which rests at 384, up from 192. Outside of that, the two displays boast very similar specs. It should be noted that should you choose to buy the P Series Quantum X in its 75-inch form, the number of local dimming zones increases to 480.

Vizio_2019_P-Series_Quantum_X_Back-Closeup.jpgThe P Series Quantum X sports five HDMI inputs (two side, three bottom), a single Component video input (side), an Ethernet port (bottom), USB port (side), and a TV Tuner input. Outputs include a single analog audio out, as well as a digital audio out, both located along the bottom. ARC is also present via HDMI for those needing that functionality. There are two, 10-Watt loudspeakers internal, though I doubt many reading this will be utilizing the display's internal speakers much, if at all.

Behind the screen, the P Series Quantum X utilizes an Octa-Core Processor, a carryover from the P Series Quantum. The panel itself has a native resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 which is good for Ultra HD/4K viewing, with an effective refresh rate of 240Hz. Vizio claims a five-million-to-one dynamic contrast ratio. Also, the P Series Quantum X is capable of displaying over a billion colors. As for HDR content, the P Series Quantum X supports Dolby Vision, HDR10, and HLG. Ultra HD codec support includes HEVC (h.265), which is necessary for many of today's best 4K streaming platforms, as well as VP9, which is a newer, more efficient, royalty-free codec used most notably by YouTube. Lastly, the P Series Quantum X has built-in Wi-Fi (802.11ac Dual Band) as well as Vizio's own SmartCast with Chromecast built-in as its native operating system. More on that in a bit. Vizio_2019_PX-Series_PX65-G1_Front.jpg

The P Series Quantum X's remote is 100-percent plastic and rather cheap feeling, though its basic enough to memorize by feel rather quickly. I say "by feel," because the all-black remote has zero backlighting or glow-in-the-dark keys, making impossible to navigate in low-light situations by anything other than feel. Still, for what it is, it's functional, pretty responsive, and not too directional.

The Hookup
The P Series Quantum X arrived the day after Sony's fantastic X950G left my home. The X950G is one of the true standouts of 2019 so far, so to say the P Series Quantum X had some big shoes to fill is an understatement. 

Vizio_2019_P-Series_Quantum_X_ID.jpgI set the P Series Quantum X up on the main wall of my living room where I test all the displays that come through. Mounting the P Series Quantum X is a job best suited for two, but it can be done solo as I did. Once on the wall I decided to utilize the P Series Quantum X all on its own for a bit, which is to say that I didn't connect it to any third-party devices, at least not at first. Instead I connected a pair of Kanto YU6 loudspeakers to the P Series Quantum X's analog audio outputs, which allowed me to have a 2.1 channel home theater setup with only two speakers, the matching Kanto sub, and the P Series Quantum X serving as the main display and source component. So many displays nowadays have all the apps and smart tech a guy like me could ask for that I often question the need to connect superfluous components--even those as minor as my Roku player.

With everything mounted and setup I began my initial measurements of the P Series Quantum X. Out of the box, I wouldn't classify any Vizio as calibrated; they definitely do require some tweaking, though the P Series Quantum X isn't too far off the mark. First, let me just say, speaking about calibration in 2019 feels a bit like yelling into the void, for statistically few people actually calibrate their displays, despite demanding reference-grade performance. With that said, here is a summary of sorts with respect to how the P Series Quantum X fared straight out of the box measured using both an SD/HD and HDR workflow within SpectraCal's CalMAN software.

Vizio_2019_P-Series_Quantum_X_Left-Side.jpg

Regardless of the picture profile chosen, none was absolutely perfect out of the box. The Calibrated preset proved to be the most accurate, both in terms of its grey scale and color accuracy overall. Calibrated Dark was the next best option, followed by Standard, which is the default for the P Series Quantum X. So, if you rush out and purchase the P Series Quantum X for yourself, be sure to set it to the Calibrated picture profile before sitting down for any sort of critical viewing.

In its Calibrated profile, the out of the box margin of error, with respect to its greyscale, rested (largely) below a Delta E of five. Anything under three is considered calibrated and below what we can (likely) perceive; so, the fact that the bulk of the measurements fell below that threshold with the other third falling just above is good. Yes, there are displays that measure better out of the box, but the P Series Quantum X isn't too far off the mark. The color bias to the P Series Quantum X's grey scale was a touch red, whereas I had been expecting a blue shift, as most displays err to that side of the spectrum. For what it's worth, the Standard, Calibrated Dark, Vivid, and Computer presets all favored blue in their greyscale measurements, but the Calibrated profile didn't, it leaned ever so slightly warm.

Color via the Calibrated preset proved pretty accurate to the point of being able to be called "calibrated" out of the box. Green and Cyan were the least accurate, but were well within the ballpark of what I'd consider to be good enough, or otherwise calibrated.

Vizio_XRT136-Remote.jpg

Using an HDR test pattern within CalMAN I measured the P Series Quantum X's max light output to be a whopping 3,400 Nits when in its Calibrated profile. That's a lot of light output, and proof positive that Vizio's claims of 3,000 Nit brightness for the P Series Quantum X isn't bullshit. I repeated this measurement several times over the course of an hour or so, and got a range of values between 3,100 and 3,400 Nits. It should be noted that upon detecting an HDR signal the P Series Quantum X will override or adjust any and all backlight and brightness settings to ensure proper viewing of HDR content.

I went ahead and made some adjustments to the Calibrated picture profile via the P Series Quantum X's higher CMS controls in order to tidy a few things up, resulting in a picture that, near as makes no difference, ended up being "perfect."

A few things to note after you've set the display to its Calibrated picture profile: first, turn all of the P Series Quantum X's sharpening to zero or off, as having it on will result in edge artifacts and moiré. Disable Vizio's Enhanced Viewing Angle feature as well, as it dramatically alters the overall image and color fidelity but not for the better. Vizio's own hint text below the feature itself speaks to a loss in resolution when this is feature is set to on, but it does a lot more than just soften the image; it dramatically alters its color, as well.

Lastly, turn all dynamic backlighting/contrast features to low or off (it's up to you) in order to maximize the display's black level performance. I was able to measure absolute black on the P Series Quantum X, a feat usually reserved for OLED displays, and it makes a difference in real world viewing when you can visually experience absolute black versus a very, very dark shade of grey.

Click over to Page Two for Performance, The Downside, Comparison & Competition, and Conclusion...


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HTR Product Rating for Vizio P Series Quantum X Ultra HD Smart TV

Criteria Rating

Performance

4.5

Value

4

Overall

4.5

Disagree with our product rating? Email us and tell us why you think this product should receive a higher rating.

Available at Amazon

For your convenience we've included a link to Amazon.com to buy this product. As an Amazon Associate, HomeTheaterReview.com benefits from qualifying purchases.


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